Keeping the blogosphere posted on the goings on of the world of submarines since late 2004... and mocking and belittling general foolishness wherever it may be found. Idaho's first and foremost submarine blog. (If you don't like something on this blog, please E-mail me; don't call me at home.)

Friday, August 15, 2008

NR-1 To Become Museum Boat?

I fully support this initiative from "Team Connecticut":
When its service ends, NR-1 will go to Portsmouth Naval Shipyard, where its fuel will be removed, and then to Puget Sound Naval Shipyard in Washington, where its nuclear reactor will be removed and the ship dismantled. The pieces would be recycled or buried at a nuclear reservation in Washington.
It would be “cut up into unrecognizable chunks,” said Michael Riegel, executive director of the Submarine Force Library and Museum Association. “That's the part we're trying to avoid.”
Riegel and David Goebel, president of the museum association, convened the meeting of NR-1 supporters Thursday to formulate a strategy for bringing the submarine back to Groton once the reactor is removed.
Their hope is that NR-1 will become a part of the U.S. Navy Submarine Force Museum, which is already home to the USS Nautilus (SSN 571), the world's first nuclear-powered submarine.
The state and local officials, museum representatives, Electric Boat employees and current and former NR-1 officers discussed the Navy's response to their initial inquiries about NR-1's future, options for expanding the museum and the possibility of securing some of the submarine's parts, including the sail, before it heads to the West Coast.
The NR-1 is a really remarkable piece of technology, and it would be completely appropriate to keep it available for future generations to appreciate.

14 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

I think that NR1 should be a museum. Rickovers barge. was very KOOL. but NOY as KOOL as Dolphin AGSS 555, if you get my drift.
(sorry, couldn't help it. Deep submergence is a relative thing,,,,,,,even for a nuke.) Glenn 609B. 555, 595

8/15/2008 12:35 PM

 
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Any one know if there are plans to replace the NR-1 for the types of missions it conducted?

8/15/2008 12:52 PM

 
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Any one know if there are plans to replace the NR-1 for the types of missions it conducted?

Don't know...but you might want to post something on the Russian or Chinese Embassy message boards. I'm sure they'd be interested.

Doh...!

8/15/2008 1:01 PM

 
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Whatdaymeanbythat? Did I say something wrong? Glenn 609B, 555. 595


?

8/15/2008 1:53 PM

 
Anonymous Anonymous said...

The article pretty much has all the important missions: shipwreck locating, artifact finding, space shuttle part collecting, and plane crash investigating.

It's not like it was counting whales in the North Atlantic, we saved that mission for specialer boats!

8/15/2008 5:14 PM

 
Blogger BlueShirtO said...

I am a bit peeved that all of the S boats, Permits, and maybe all the Sturgeons have been made into razor blades without thought to preserving any for posterity. Does anyone know if I am wrong? I hope I am.

8/15/2008 8:06 PM

 
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Although I'm showing my age, my first boat was an S-girl. When on a later boat at PSNS, my first boat showed up across the pier, on its way to becoming a bunch of glow-in-the-dark Gillette Track IIs. On one duty day, my "tour of the pier" included a tour of my first boat. I wanted to take home a souvenir, but I couldn't figure out how to steal the negative tank, my wife wouldn't allow me to keep a bow plane or main coolant pump in the carport, and the neighbors wouldn't have appreciated a 400-pound air line hooked up to the ship's whistle, like we had on the boat (thanks to GRF). Don't knock a stern shot until you've tried one!

8/17/2008 8:50 PM

 
Blogger Zoe Brain said...

The article pretty much has all the important missions: shipwreck locating, artifact finding, space shuttle part collecting, and plane crash investigating.

Drink Warning next time please.

8/17/2008 10:55 PM

 
Blogger jeff said...

LOL, yeah Zoe, that's about right!

Glenn, if you were Anonymous 12:52, you ought to know what oughtn't be asked.

8/18/2008 4:08 PM

 
Anonymous Glenn said...

I wuzzant, and diddant. Glenn 609B. 555, 595

8/19/2008 9:35 AM

 
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Anonymous 12:52 - Just as sure as the Navy didn't spend over $100M simply for a "research" submarine in hopes of a better look at HMHS Britannic, you can be sure of two things. First, we do not abandon valuable programs and capabilities. And second, we do not abandon valuable programs and capabilities. Take a deep breath, perhaps a step back, and relax.

2/18/2009 1:52 PM

 
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I work at PSNS in Bremerton, and happened to see NR-1 today, tucked into a corner floating on a barge, seemingly forgotten. If the Dolphin and Nautilus can become museums, why not this incredible vessel?

3/13/2012 10:19 PM

 
Anonymous HSumption 608, 610, 727B, 736G, 646 said...

"I am a bit peeved that all of the S boats, Permits, and maybe all the Sturgeons have been made into razor blades without thought to preserving any for posterity. Does anyone know if I am wrong? I hope I am"

The sail of the Sturgeon is on display at the Naval Undersea Warfare Museum in Keyportm WA, and that of the Parche is displayed just outside the main gate at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard.

3/13/2012 10:25 PM

 
Blogger Mike Chapman said...

A Google search will take you to the many videos shot in the preserved French Polaris-type boat that's now a museum. Apparently the reactor compartment was removed and replaced with an empty hull section, but the engine room, tunnel and most of the rest of the boat seem to be accessible. It would be great to see something like that in this country. I enjoyed touring the Nautilus but she's been so sanitized and "papered over" with metal mesh that it's almost a caricature.

3/12/2013 1:19 PM

 

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