Keeping the blogosphere posted on the goings on of the world of submarines since late 2004... and mocking and belittling general foolishness wherever it may be found. Idaho's first and foremost submarine blog. (If you don't like something on this blog, please E-mail me; don't call me at home.)

Monday, July 04, 2005

British Anti-Sub Protesters Have More Fun

As much as I disagree with the anti-Trident protesters in Scotland, I can't help but grudgingly admire their panache:

"There were cheers when it was announced that one protester had managed to breach security and that another was sitting on top of the fence near the fuel depot.
"The 33-year-old care worker, from Banff, quickly became a bit of a celebrity as he held court from his vantage point - which he promised was free of midges.
"He maintained that position despite the calls of fellow protesters who suggested that he tried his hand at a piece of very risky crowd surfing...

"Raising a smile was certainly the intention of some of the protesters, with slogans such as Newts not Nukes, Brunch not Bombs and Custard Creams not Cluster Bombs.
"Laughter was also the goal of the troops from the
Clandestine Insurgent Rebel Clown Army (Circa)."

Some local businesspeople weren't in a laughing mood, however:

"Police were prepared to let people make their protest without moving them on - but there was little sympathy for the action in the village itself.
"The streets were deserted, and business was suffering in the minimarket at the Faslane end of Garelochhead.

"Behind the counter Akram Mohammad admitted that the place was like a ghost town, and one of his customers could barely contain his contempt for the protesters.
"They should be locked up for the vandalism that they cause," fumed the man, who declined to give his name.
"They cause disruption, local shops lose business and nobody wants them here. They are just a bunch of jokes."


I remember being protested by the "Raging Grannies" in Victoria, B.C., in 1991. (Some of their fellow anti-nuclear protesters have what looks like a pretty complete list of U.S. boats that visitied Nanoose in 1991... where some claim that I watched the live lesbian stage show at some bar in town, which is completely untrue. But I digress.)
The "Raging Grannies" came out in kayaks and shouted some very funny phrases and sang some humorous songs. Their charm, however, was marred by the fact that their leader, a younger male, was described by the Canadian submariners who were our hosts as an ex-American who fled to avoid service in Vietnam (I won't use their pregorative term "draft dodger" to describe him.)

Anyway, the Commonwealth protesters seem like they have a little more of a sense of humor than those here in the U.S.

Going deep...

4 Comments:

Anonymous Byron Audler said...

Back in the late '80s, I had a chance to work on the Greenpeace, that wonderful vessel that got so much attention getting in the midst of things like missile tests. On this splendid occasion, she had the misfortune to get in the way of one down at the Cape, and a USN tug "shouldered" her hard enough to stove her hull in. Leaking water, she fetched up in Jacksonville, Fla, with money out, asking for repairs. Greedy little shipyard that we were, we agreed to work on the ship. I was on night shift, continuing the removal of damaged plate just above the water line. The damage was located mainly in what one could see was the ships crew lounge, given the tables, sofas, chairs, TV and books. Shortly before I knocked off, I saw a blackboard, with the ships schedule on it. A light bulb went on above my hard hat, and I grabbed a piece of chalk. The next day, the crew came aboard, to find:

"USN:1 GREENPEACE:0"

I got a little grief, but not much, and it was well worth the pain.

7/04/2005 3:05 PM

 
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Back in the late '80s, I had a chance to work on the Greenpeace, that wonderful vessel that got so much attention getting in the midst of things like missile tests. On this splendid occasion, she had the misfortune to get in the way of one down at the Cape, and a USN tug "shouldered" her hard enough to stove her hull in. Leaking water, she fetched up in Jacksonville, Fla, with money out, asking for repairs. Greedy little shipyard that we were, we agreed to work on the ship. I was on night shift, continuing the removal of damaged plate just above the water line. The damage was located mainly in what one could see was the ships crew lounge, given the tables, sofas, chairs, TV and books. Shortly before I knockereview

7/04/2005 3:05 PM

 
Anonymous Byron Audler said...

Back in the late '80s, I had a chance to work on the Greenpeace, that wonderful vessel that got so much attention getting in the midst of things like missile tests. On this splendid occasion, she had the misfortune to get in the way of one down at the Cape, and a USN tug "shouldered" her hard enough to stove her hull in. Leaking water, she fetched up in Jacksonville, Fla, with money out, asking for repairs. Greedy little shipyard that we were, we agreed to work on the ship. I was on night shift, continuing the removal of damaged plate just above the water line. The damage was located mainly in what one could see was the ships crew lounge, given the tables, sofas, chairs, TV and books. Shortly before I knocked off, I saw a blackboard, with the ships schedule on it. A light bulb went on above my hard hat, and I grabbed a piece of chalk. The next day, the crew came aboard, to find:

"USN:1 GREENPEACE:0"

I got a little grief, but not much, and it was well worth the pain.

7/04/2005 3:05 PM

 
Blogger half said...

Love it Byron. I would have stolen their copy if Tropik of Cancer.

7/04/2005 5:21 PM

 

Post a Comment

<< Home