Keeping the blogosphere posted on the goings on of the world of submarines since late 2004... and mocking and belittling general foolishness wherever it may be found. Idaho's first and foremost submarine blog. (If you don't like something on this blog, please E-mail me; don't call me at home.)

Friday, August 05, 2005

Seven Trapped on Russian Bathyscaphe

Seven Russian sailors are trapped on board a Russian military deep-diving submersible 50-100 miles south of "Petr", with enough air to last until sometime this weekend; they reportedly got trapped in a fishing net of some type. Japanese ships are apparently on the way, and the Russians have alreay contacted the U.S. for help. I would imagine the DSRV Mystic is probably getting ready to roll from San Diego.
The bathyscaphe, apparently called an AS-28 "Priz", is reportedly about 44 feet long and normally carries a crew of three; it is carrying seven as it took part in a combat training exercise.
Not much more information available now, and I'm off to work, so I won't be able to update until tonight. Here's a story on how DSRV's deploy (with pictures); here's the Google submarine news page. It looks like the Russians have learned the lessons from the loss of the Kursk five years ago and are asking for help early; hopefully we'll have some good news to report on the rescue of the crew sometime this weekend.

Staying at PD...

Update 0548: It looks like the latest-breaking rumors I could find are on this Moscow Times page of Hot News; just keep scrolling down, it should update. Remember, though, it is the Moscow Times...

Update 0605: Here's the latest CNN article; normally, with breaking news stories, they just keep updating the story at the same URL; hopefully they'll do that with this one. From this story:

"A camera sent down in the water shows that during a dive, the vessel's propeller became stuck in a fishing net, snagging further when the crew tried to free it, said Dygalo. Some kind of cable or wire was also involved, he said.
"Russia has requested a vessel from Japan, he said. It was en route to the scene, along with a Russian vessel.
"An official from U.S. Pacific Command said Russia asked the United States to assess what resources it would have available for a rescue.
"Military officials are trying to figure out the best way to rescue the crewmen, who cannot leave the vessel because of its depth..."


Update 1942 05 Aug: Just got home from work. I'll post more after I go through all the information, but in the meantime check out this CNN story with a picture of the Super Scorpio the U.S. is sending from San Diego, this info-packed entry from Citizen Smash, and of course the world's foremost submarine group blog, Ultraquiet No More...

10 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

Our prayers are with them.

RM1/SS

8/05/2005 6:18 AM

 
Blogger Chap said...

Thanks for the gouge...more at my place while I'm at a work break...

8/05/2005 9:58 AM

 
Blogger PigBoatSailor said...

Ultraquiet, too. Sheesh, your own group blog and you don't advertise ;-)

The Sub Report has a good roundup, too.

8/05/2005 10:03 AM

 
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I pray that the russians will use every resource possible to their advantage.

8/05/2005 10:27 AM

 
Blogger chaoticsynapticactivity said...

You realize, or course, this is more of the way we cause world change...

How many years ago were eyeing each other with evil intent?

I hope they crew makes it.

8/05/2005 11:28 AM

 
Blogger ninme said...

Erm, I have a stupid question. The ...airforce I guess has a stealth bomber or two in Guam as a diplomatic point, letting Pacific nations know they're "serious" about stability in the area, etc. So... Shouldn't they have one of these unmanned diver thingies they're flying out from San Diego tucked away in the middle of the ocean rather than on the far side, too?

And I don't suppose a regular submarine (and I'm sure there's one in the area, given the neighbors) could go up and look and see what's caught in the thing, could it?

8/05/2005 3:42 PM

 
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I think the Russians should start keeping their submarine fleet in port during August. Kursk, Aug 00; K-159, Aug 03; now this....

Of course, port doesn't seem to be a good place for them in August, either. The K-140 reactor accident, Aug 68; the K-123 reactor accident, Aug 82; the K-314 reactor accident, Aug 85....


RM1(SS) (ret)

8/05/2005 4:45 PM

 
Blogger Bubblehead said...

Ninme -- The American sub rescue assets in San Diego are the "one source" to support our worldwide efforts, so they need to be closer to the East Coast too. As far as a regular sub being up in the "Sea of O"... they'd probably be hauling ass to Sasebo to mate up with the manned DSRV, if we decide to go that route...

pigboatsailor: Good coverage in my absence! I was going to mention "Ultraquiet No More", but I found out about the accident when I checked the 'net at 0515, and had to be on the road for work by 0600. I was lucky to post what I got posted!

8/05/2005 9:08 PM

 
Blogger ninme said...

So there's only the two of them? Must be expensive, for such lil' things. Speaking of their size, I distinctly heard the news guy say that that plane that flew off with them was the airforce's biggest cargo plane. For just two of those lil' guys? Not to sound completely ignorant but are they really heavy or something? Just that plane didn't look terribly...quick, is all.

8/06/2005 12:34 AM

 
Anonymous rebootinit said...

What bothers me in this is wondering if the net is just caught in the screw, or is it caught on the bottom also? I would think even a small research submarine would carry a reserve buoyancy capacity to expel in case of an emergency like this.
The media kills me, because all they are talking about is o2 levels. The co2 levels will build up much faster than the o2 is consumed and become toxic before they get down even as low as 16 percent o2 (where it becomes dangerous).
Just a few interesting questions....

8/06/2005 1:52 AM

 

Post a Comment

<< Home