Keeping the blogosphere posted on the goings on of the world of submarines since late 2004... and mocking and belittling general foolishness wherever it may be found. Idaho's first and foremost submarine blog. (If you don't like something on this blog, please E-mail me; don't call me at home.)

Monday, October 03, 2005

Was Blind, But Now I See...

Occasionally here at TSSBP, I see a story on submarines that I'm like 99% sure is wrong, but there's enough of a chance that things have changed in the year I've been out of the Navy that I want to get more information before I mock and belittle the writers.

Such was the case yesterday, when I read the wire service story on the San Diego Fleet Week's "Sea and Air Parade". Here're the paragraphs that confused me:

"Ships that participated in the procession included an aircraft carrier, cruiser, guided missile destroyer, nuclear submarine and an amphibious assault ship.
"A crew of about 10 sailors stood at attention on the submarine deck, as onlookers waved and cheered the massive ship, most of it under water."


You see, the Sea and Air Parade mostly takes place on the downtown side of North Island (in this overhead picture, the Sub Base in to the left of the southwest corner of North "Island", and downtown is to the right, north of the curved bridge that goes to Coronado/North "Island"). For some reason, nuclear submarines never, ever go over to that side of the bay. So that's what had me confused. Had NR ended the prohibition against sending subs over to that side of the bay? I didn't figure that the writer would have misidentified some other type of ship as a submarine...

Today, my confusion was resolved. Because of the nuke-centrism of the U.S. Sub Force, I had forgotten about the good ship HMS Gotland, the Swedish diesel sub that is helping train our ASW forces in San Diego for the next year. They were the boat that got to take part in the parade, and hopefully they had a good time. Now, to the delayed mocking of the article. There are enough people with military experience in San Diego that the writers should be able to have someone fact-check their articles before publishing to catch such errors as mistaking a diesel boat for a nuclear one. I especially liked how they described the (relatively) tiny diesel boat as "massive". The Navy picture has a nice contrast between the size of the USS Ronald Reagan and the sub -- interestingly, if there was a one-on-one fight between the two ships, I'd rate it as a toss-up as to which one would be sunk first...

Bell-ringer 1153 03 Oct: A commenter lets us know that local SSNs have taken part in the Parade before:
"I was on board Salt Lake City when we participated in the parade of ships back in 2002 (also on a Saturday). We started out by buoy SD, waited for the parade to start then made the trip to the North side of the bay, turned around just prior to the bridge and came back. I think we had about 50 guys on board that day."

7 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

Bubblehead,

I was on board Salt Lake City when we participated in the parade of ships back in 2002 (also on a Saturday). We started out by buoy SD, waited for the parade to start then made the trip to the North side of the bay, turned around just prior to the bridge and came back. I think we had about 50 guys on board that day.

10/03/2005 11:41 AM

 
Blogger Vigilis said...

Another excellent catch, Bubblehead.

San Diego's first Fleet Week (1935) was described as the mightiest fleet ever assembled under the United States flag. It included forty-eight battleships, cruisers and carriers, with more than 3000 commissioned officers and 55,000 enlisted men. This may not be the first time a foreign flag has been sighted in the event's history, but it is probably a first for our viking friends from Sweden.

10/03/2005 11:46 AM

 
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I was onboard USS Houston SSN-713 in October of 1992 when we participated in the parade. We got underway early Sat morning formed up right off Point Loma and made are way up to the North Island turn basin and tied up around 16-1700.
xft1ss

10/03/2005 1:13 PM

 
Blogger Zoe Brain said...

I know the A-19, I know the sonar (heck, there's bits of my actual programming, not just design work on her), lotsa luck going against one of her class.

10/03/2005 8:25 PM

 
Anonymous Nisse Sweden said...

HMS Gotland is Sterlingpowered not Antiqe Diesel

10/13/2005 1:43 AM

 
Anonymous Anonymous said...

http://www.stirlingengines.org.uk/manufact/manf/misc/subm.html

10/13/2005 1:53 AM

 
Anonymous Anonymous said...

HMS Gotland is certainly not an antique - she actually "sunk" USS Ronald Reagan in an exercise - and got away...

7/30/2008 3:58 AM

 

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