Keeping the blogosphere posted on the goings on of the world of submarines since late 2004... and mocking and belittling general foolishness wherever it may be found. Idaho's first and foremost submarine blog. (If you don't like something on this blog, please E-mail me; don't call me at home.)

Saturday, February 10, 2007

Homework From Ninme

Actually, not from Ninme herself, but from one of her commenters. Ninme had a post about semi-submersible cargo ships, and one of the pictures in the link was of one of them hauling a submarine:

The question is, what type of submarine is that? It sure looks like a Russian boat, but what class? An Alfa, maybe?

12 Comments:

Anonymous HalfEmpty said...

Hard to tell, but it doesn't look to have the length of a November...

I did find thisn while looking...

http://www.heiszwolf.com/subs/plans/plans.html

What makes me wonder is the idea of a Russian submarine on a western heavy lifter? Maybe this is a western boat.

2/10/2007 7:28 AM

 
Anonymous sonarman said...

My guess it's a Victor I. But halfempty raises a good point about a Russian boat being on a Western heavy lifter, especially a nuke.

Unless the hull has been completely gutted of nuke propulsion material and machinery, I highly doubt the Russians would just allow someone to come along and plunk it on the deck of their flatbed.

2/10/2007 7:52 AM

 
Anonymous Robin White said...

The Norwegians are deeply involved with Northern Fleet decomm operations, for obvious, self-interested reasons, and we should be very happy they are.
Robin White

2/10/2007 9:32 AM

 
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Just one? Here's three at once!

2/10/2007 9:49 AM

 
Anonymous ex SSN Officer said...

The angle makes it a tough call between a November class and an Alpha. But by tuning out the silhouette you can see by process of elimination that it's clearly a November: it's rusting.

Novembers hulls were made of steel -- Alphas were titanium alloy.

2/10/2007 12:35 PM

 
Anonymous ex SSN Officer said...

Oops -- looks like I took the bait a little too quickly.

It is indeed a Victor...and, again, that's determined by the process of elimination via this article.

2/10/2007 12:48 PM

 
Blogger ninme said...

Good work, class! Now, who can tell me where this picture was taken? Extra points for time of year!

(and it's ninme. ninme.)

2/10/2007 1:04 PM

 
Blogger Bubblehead said...

You're right -- it's not capitalized. I've never noticed that before. So now will you tell us what it means?

2/10/2007 2:47 PM

 
Anonymous Anonymous said...

LOL

They must have learned not to *tow* after all.

2/10/2007 6:36 PM

 
Anonymous sonarman said...

The shape of the sail of the Alfa was very low and streamlined, moreso than the sub in the picture, so it's not an Alfa. It couldn't be a Victor III because it didn't have a pod-thingy on the rudder. It couldn't have been a November due to age and shape of the sail; November sails are more angular, and more tubular shaped aft. It couldn't have been a Charlie because they are more bulbous around the bow due to their cruise missile cannisters. It didn't have a notch at the top of the rudder of a Victor II, so that left a Victor I.

And before anyone vaporlocks that I'm giving away classified data, just go over to Global Security.org for a few pics of each Victor variant and the other subs, and you'll see that none of what I said is classified.

That being said, I can't say whether or not I could tell right off the bat what it was just by looking at it...

2/10/2007 7:48 PM

 
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Just because it's on Global Security.org doesn't make it UNCLAS.

2/12/2007 1:14 AM

 
Blogger Bubblehead said...

ninme -- I fixed the capitalization on my blogroll.

2/13/2007 10:24 PM

 

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